First place:

Name: Devon Healey

Institution: University of Toronto

E-mail: devon.healey@mail.utoronto.ca

Paper title:

Eyeing the Pedagogy of Trouble: The Cultural Documentation of the Problem-Subject.  

Biography:

Devon Healey is a blind 4th year PhD Candidate from the Dept. of Social Justice Education at OISE/University of Toronto. She holds a B.A. (Hons.) Specialists Degree in Theatre and Drama from the University of Toronto at Mississauga; a Diploma in Theatre Studies from Sheridan College; as well as a B.Ed. and M.Ed. from OISE/UT. Her work explores how blindness makes an appearance in culture and is informed by Blind Studies, Disability Studies, Phenomenology and Erving Goffman’s Dramaturgical Model. Devon is an award-winning actor and active member in the Toronto arts community working with directors such as Guillermo del Toro on “The Strain.” Her most recent article with Tanya Titchkosky and Rod Michalko titled, “Blindness Simulation and the Culture of Sight” can be found in the Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies.

Abstract:

Blindness lives in a world, one both organized and defined by the eye that sees itself as sighted. Seeing is believing, and this belief, eyes believe, is learning. But, what if the eyes that are “seeing” are “blind”? Do we believe these eyes as we do those that see? Do we learn from blind eyes as we do from sighted ones?

This paper seeks to question not only what sighted eyes see, but also what they imagine – what do they imagine they are seeing when they look? And, when sighted eyes look at blind eyes, what do they imagine they are seeing? Certainly, not sight. But what? If sight believes not only what it sees, but that it sees, then seeing blindness must be imagined as seeing “no sight”. Thus, blind eyes see nothing and cannot be believed, let alone learned from.

This paper will explore this conventional view of the blind/sight dichotomy and will do so through autobiography. This exploration is one that serves to provoke sighted imagination to go beyond what its conventional version of itself is – to go beyond what sight imagines blindness to be. Blindness can disrupt sight and such disruption often leads to discomfort, and this marks a critical site for re-imagining what we ordinarily see when we look at blindness. In this sense, blindness is teacher; but, like anything else, we must let blindness teach us. Thus, this paper seeks to develop a pedagogy that embraces the disruptive power of blindness. 

Keywords:

blindness, emotion, discomfort, medicine, imagination, pedagogy, identity, trouble

Second place:

Name: Kim Collins

Institution: York University

Paper title:

Resistance to Neoliberalism: Slow Scholarship and Disability 

Abstract:

Neoliberalism is transforming universities as well as those who work and learn within them. Students, sessional instructors, faculty and staff are formed in and by neoliberal understandings of productivity. Through an examination of manifestations of slowness in the academy, this paper interrogates the place (or displacement) of slowness under neoliberalism in Ontario’s public universities. It is argued that neoliberalism enables ableism to flourish termed, neoliberal-ableism. The paper argues that slowness, while currently devalued in public universities, can be used as a form of resistance to the entrenchment of neoliberalism. The paper provides a critique of the university as a structural institution through a consideration of definitions of the word ‘slow.’ Finally, this paper considers the worrisome implications of a fast-paced university and how disability can open spaces of resistance for those working and learning in the academy, including strategies to reinvent both the university and slow scholarship. 

Keywords:

slow scholarship; disability; neoliberalism; resistance

Third place

Full name: Claire Burrows

Institution: Western University

Contact e-mail: cburrow5@uwo.ca

Biography:

Claire Burrows completed her PhD in Library and Information Science from Western University in 2019, and she was the 2018 Researcher-in-Residence at Concordia University Library. Her doctoral research pertains to accessibility of academic libraries in Canada for students with disabilities. By approaching this topic with a framework developed from disability studies, her research focus is on developing a better understanding of the current practices in these libraries—and of their limitations—with a view to developing strategies for improving accessibility and better supporting students with disabilities.

Paper title:

Energizing librarians and library users through critical disability theory

Abstract:

Accessibility is increasingly a topic of focus in the library and information science (LIS) community. Despite the interest in creating accessible libraries, LIS literature and research on accessibility is limited in scope. Studies often focus on website accessibility guidelines and the use of adaptive technologies, while other publications discuss the effects of legislative policies for libraries. This limited focus has practical implications for how LIS professionals provide services to disabled communities, which in turn can affect opportunities for information access, education and inclusion in a valuable community resource. This paper provides a review of existing research approaches to accessibility in LIS, as well as a philosophical exploration of how concepts from critical disability theory can contribute to LIS research and practice by introducing new conceptualizations of disability and accessibility. As Goodley (2013) highlights, “Critical disability studies might be viewed…as a lifted out space: a platform or plateau to think through, act, resist, relate, communicate, engage with one another against the hybridized forms of oppression and discrimination that so often do not speak singularly of disability” (p. 641). Libraries, as community institutions with a central mandate of providing information services to all citizens, may be especially suited to engaging with these theories in practice. In turn, this exploration may introduce a community space for self-empowerment. 

Keywords:

libraries; accessibility; applications of critical disability theory


Première place :

Name: Devon Healey

Institution: University of Toronto

Courriel: devon.healey@mail.utoronto.ca

Titre de l’article :

Un regard sur la pédagogie du trouble : La documentation culturelle du problème-sujet. 

Biographie :

Devon Healey est une étudiante aveugle du doctorat en 4e année du Département d’éducation en justice sociale de l’OISE/Université de Toronto. Elle détient un baccalauréat spécialisé en théâtre et en art dramatique de l’Université de Toronto à Mississauga, un diplôme en études théâtrales du Sheridan College, ainsi qu’un baccalauréat et une maitrise en éducation de l’OISE/UT. Son travail explore comment la cécité fait son apparition dans la culture et s’inspire des Blind Studies, les Études sur le handicap, la Phénoménologie et le modèle dramaturgique d’Erving Goffman. Devon est une actrice primé et un membre actif de la communauté artistique de Toronto qui travaille avec des metteurs en scène comme Guillermo del Toro (dans « The Strain ». Son plus récent article, avec Tanya Titchkosky et Rod Michalko, intitulé « Blindness Simulation and the Culture of Sight » a été publié dans le Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies.

Résumé :

La cécité vit dans un monde à la fois organisé et défini par l’œil qui se considère comme voyant. Voir, c’est croire, et cette croyance, les yeux croient que c’est apprendre. Mais, et si les yeux qui « voient » sont « aveugles » ? Croyons-nous ces yeux comme ceux qui voient ? Est-ce que nous apprenons des yeux aveugles comme nous apprenons des voyants ?

Cet article cherche à questionner non seulement ce que les voyants voient, mais aussi ce qu’ils imaginent – qu’est-ce qu’ils imaginent voir quand ils regardent ? Et quand les voyants regardent les aveugles, qu’est-ce qu’ils imaginent voir ? Certainement pas la vue. Mais quoi ? Si la vue croit non seulement ce qu’elle voit, mais qu’elle voit, alors la cécité doit être imaginée comme ne voyant « aucune vue ». Ainsi, les yeux aveugles ne voient rien et on ne peut pas les croire, et encore moins apprendre.

Cet article explore cette vision conventionnelle de la dichotomie aveugle/vision et le fera par le biais de l’autobiographie. Cette exploration sert à provoquer l’imagination d’un voyant pour aller au-delà de ce qui est sa version conventionnelle d’elle-même – pour aller au-delà de ce que la vue imagine que c’est la cécité. La cécité peut perturber la vue et une telle perturbation entraine souvent de l’inconfort, ce qui marque un point critique pour ré-imaginer ce que l’on voit habituellement quand on regarde la cécité. En ce sens, la cécité nous enseigne ; mais, comme toute autre chose, nous devons laisser la cécité nous enseigner. Ainsi, cet article cherche à développer une pédagogie qui embrasse le pouvoir perturbateur de la cécité.

Mots-clés :

Cécité, Émotion, Malaise, Médecine, Imagination, Pédagogie, Identité, Trouble

Deuxième place :

Nom : Kim Collins

Institution : York University

Courriel: kimberlee.collins@ryerson.ca

Titre de l’article :

Résistance au néolibéralisme : « Slow Scholarship » et handicap

Résumé :

Le néolibéralisme transforme les universités ainsi que ceux qui y travaillent et y apprennent. Les étudiants, les chargés de cours, le corps professoral et le personnel sont formés dans et par la compréhension néolibérale de la productivité. En examinant les manifestations de la lenteur (manifestations of slowness) dans le milieu universitaire, cet article analyse la place (ou le déplacement) de la lenteur sous le néolibéralisme dans les universités publiques de l’Ontario. Nous affirmons que le néolibéralisme permet au capacitisme de s’épanouir sous le nom de néolibéralisme-capacitisme. Le document soutient que la lenteur, bien qu’actuellement dévaluée dans les universités publiques, peut être utilisée comme une forme de résistance à l’établissement du néolibéralisme. L’article présente une critique de l’université en tant qu’institution structurelle en examinant les définitions du mot « lent » (slow). Enfin, cet article examine les implications inquiétantes d’une université au rythme effréné et comment le handicap peut ouvrir des espaces de résistance pour ceux et celles qui travaillent et apprennent dans le milieu universitaire, y compris des stratégies pour réinventer à la fois l’université et la recherche lente.

Mots-clés :

« slow scholarship », handicap, néolibéralisme, résistance

Troisième place :

Nom: Claire Burrows

Institution : Western University

Courriel: cburrow5@uwo.ca

Biographie :

Claire Burrows a obtenu son doctorat en bibliothéconomie et sciences de l’information de l’Université Western en 2019, et elle a été chercheure en résidence à la bibliothèque de l’Université Concordia en 2018. Sa recherche doctorale porte sur l’accessibilité des bibliothèques universitaires au Canada pour les étudiants en situation de handicap. En abordant ce sujet à l’aide d’un cadre élaboré à partir des études sur le handicap, sa recherche vise à mieux comprendre les pratiques actuelles de ces bibliothèques – et leurs limites – en vue d’élaborer des stratégies pour améliorer l’accessibilité et mieux soutenir les étudiants en situation de handicap.

Titre de l’article :

Dynamiser les bibliothécaires et les usagers des bibliothèques grâce à la théorie critique du handicap

Résumé :

De plus en plus l’accessibilité éveille l’intérêt dans la communauté des bibliothèques et des sciences de l’information. Malgré l’intérêt pour la création de bibliothèques accessibles, la littérature et la recherche sur l’accessibilité dans ce domaine des ont une portée limitée. Les études portent souvent sur les lignes directrices en matière d’accessibilité des sites Web et sur l’utilisation des technologies d’adaptation, tandis que d’autres publications traitent des effets des politiques législatives sur les bibliothèques. Cette focalisation limitée renferme des implications pratiques sur la façon dont les professionnels en bibliothéconomie et en sciences de l’information fournissent des services à la communauté des personnes en situation de handicap, ce qui peut à son tour avoir un impact sur les possibilités d’accès à l’information et sur l’éducation, mais aussi sur l’inclusion dans les ressource communautaires. Le présent article passe en revue les approches de recherche existantes en matière d’accessibilité en bibliothéconomie et en sciences de l’information, ainsi qu’une exploration philosophique de la façon dont les concepts de la théorie critique du handicap peuvent contribuer à la recherche et à la pratique en bibliothéconomie et en sciences de l’information en promouvant de nouvelles conceptualisations du handicap et de l’accessibilité. Comme le souligne Goodley (2013), « les études critiques du handicap pourraient être perçues comme un espace soulevé : une plateforme ou un plateau pour réfléchir, agir, résister, s’unir, communiquer, s’engager les uns avec les autres contre les formes hybrides d’oppression et de discrimination qui ne parlent pas du handicap » (p. 641). Les bibliothèques, en tant qu’institutions communautaires dont le mandat central est de fournir des services d’information à tous les citoyens, peuvent être particulièrement adaptées à la mise en pratique de ces théories. En retour, cette exploration peut introduire un espace communautaire d’autonomisation. 

Mots-clés :

Bibliothèques ; Accessibilité ; Applications de la théorie critique du handicap